NICRP | Prevent Child Abuse Nevada: Parents

Get the FACTS about Child Sexual Abuse:

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Who are the Victims?

Abusers and Grooming Tactics

Signs & Symptoms of Child Sexual Abuse

Stages of Healthy Sexual Development

Preventing Abuse Starts in the Home

Reporting Child Sexual Abuse

Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Facts*

1 in 4 women and 1 in 20 men self-report having been sexually abused as children, almost always by someone they knew, trusted, or loved. 87% of sexual abuse cases are never reported. It is estimated that 93% of sexual abuse victims know their abusers. Additionally, 35-50% of abusers are less than 18 years of age.

WHAT IS CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE?

The American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC) defines child sexual abuse as any sexual activity with a child where consent is not or cannot be given. This includes sexual contact that is accomplished by force or threat of force, regardless of the age of the participants, and all sexual contact between an adult and a child, regardless of whether there is deception or the child understands the sexual nature of the activity. Sexual contact between an older and a younger child also can be abusive if there is a significant disparity in age, development, or size, rendering the younger child incapable of giving informed consent. While many people think that child sexual abuse always involves rape of a child, the truth is that child sexual abuse can include both touch and non-touching behaviors. Both are damaging to children and teens and both are against the law.

Touching Behaviors can Include:
  • Deliberate contact with a child or teen's genitals, buttocks or chest/breats
  • Penetration of the child or teen's mouth, anus, or vagina with an object or body part
  • Making a child or teen touch another person's anus, penis, or vagina
  • Coercing a child or teen to sexually touch him/herself, the abuser, or another child

  • Non-touching Behaviors can Include:
  • Exposing oneself to a child or teen
  • Viewing and violating the private behaviors of a child or teen
  • Taking sexually explicit or provocative photographs of a child or teen
  • Showing pornography to a child or teen
  • Communicating with a child or teen about sexually explicit fantasies or experiences in person, by phone, via email, internet, etc.
  • For more FACTS about Child Sexual Abuse:

  • Who are the Victims?

  • Abusers and Grooming Tactics

  • Signs & Symptoms of Child Sexual Abuse

  • Stages of Healthy Sexual Development

  • Preventing Abuse Starts in the Home

  • Reporting Child Sexual Abuse



  • *Information gathered from EnoughAbuse.org Program Materials.

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    Amanda Haboush-Deloye: Director of Programs- PCA Nevada
    amanda.haboush@unlv.edu

    Tara Phebus: Interim Executive Director, NICRP
    tara.phebus@unlv.edu

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